Grow a Salsa Garden Plus a Grilled Tomato Salsa Recipe

If you enjoy eating fresh salsa in the summer, growing a salsa garden will provide you with the fresh ingredients you need to whip up salsa at a moments notice. The basic ingredients that go into salsa are tomatoes, peppers, garlic, onions, and cilantro. See how you can plant all of these ingredients in a 4x4 foot raised bed or square foot garden.
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In order to help support the expense of hosting this blog, some of the links on this website are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive a small commission. Please know that the companies I partner with are evaluated and chosen carefully. I only recommend products or services I personally use or believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this both to be honest with my valued readers and in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials."The most common advice I give out to folks starting new vegetable gardens is to grow what you like to eat. If you enjoy fresh salsa in the summer, why not plant a salsa garden?

How to Plan Your Salsa Garden

Select an area that receives at least 6 hours of sunlight a day. A 4×4 foot raised bed or square foot garden will grow plenty of ingredients for fresh salsa. A trellis on the north side of the bed will provide extra room for vining tomatoes to grow without shading the other plants. See how we built our square foot gardens here.

Salsa Garden Plan for Raised Bed or Square Foot Garden | Grow a Good LifeDivide your raised bed garden into one-foot sections to make it easy to map out the growing area so you know where to plant everything in your salsa garden. Beginning at the back of the bed:

Row 4: Tomatoes (3) along a trellis
Row 3: Peppers (4) in front of the tomatoes 1 per square foot
Row 2: Onions 9 per square foot
Row 2: Garlic Fall planted garlic = 6/square foot / Spring planted Garlic = 9/square foot
Row 1: Cilantro 9 per square foot

Start onions, peppers, and tomato seedlings from seed under lights or purchase transplants from your local nursery or garden center. Onion sets, garlic seeds, garlic chive, and cilantro seeds are also available online or at your local garden center.

What to Grow in Your Salsa Garden

The basic ingredients that go into salsa are tomatoes, peppers, garlic, onions, and cilantro.

Tomatoes for your Salsa Garden | Grow a Good LifeTomatoes:

Select meaty indeterminate varieties of tomatoes with good flavor. I like using paste tomatoes such as Amish Paste, Juliet, and San Marzano. These are dense, have few seeds, and not a lot of moisture to water down the salsa. Other fleshy varieties to consider are Cherokee Purple, Brandywine, or Bloody Butcher.

Indeterminate tomato plants grow very tall and produce their fruit over a period of time. Three tomato plants located on the north side of the garden bed along the trellis will provide you with plenty of tomatoes for salsa beginning mid-summer until frost.

Purchase transplants from your local nursery or garden center or grow from seed. Start seeds indoors under lights 6 weeks before your last frost date. Transplant hardened-off seedlings into the garden after all danger of frost has past. Plant 16 inches apart along the north end of your garden in front of the trellis. Tie the vines to the trellis as the plant grows. Prune out lower branches to aid in air circulation. Water regularly if rainfall is scarce. Plants need about 1 inch of water weekly once they are actively growing.

Peppers for your Salsa Garden | Grow a Good LifePeppers:

Do you like your salsa mild or hot? For a hot salsa, select varieties of chili peppers such as Jalapeño, Serrano, or Habanera. If you prefer a mild salsa, opt for bell peppers and mix with a mildly hot pepper like Anaheim. Four different pepper plants will allow you to mix, match, and experiment with a variety of salsa flavors. Purchase transplants from your local nursery or grow from seed. Start seeds indoors under lights 8 weeks before your last frost date. Transplant hardened-off seedlings into the garden after all danger of frost has past. Space pepper plants at least 12-inches apart. Use small tomato cages to help support the plants. Water regularly if rainfall is scarce. Plants need about 1 inch of water weekly once they are actively growing.

Onions for your Salsa Garden | Grow a Good LifeOnions:

Onion flavors range from sweet to pungent. Select onion varieties that grow well in your area (How to grow onions from seed). Grow from seed, purchased transplants, or onion sets (small bulbs) found at garden centers in the spring.

Onion sets are convenient and usually sold in bulk by the pound and come in yellow, white, or red. Grab a handful of each for some variety of flavor and color. Store extra onion sets in a cool, dark location and plant whenever a spot opens up. Space onions 4-inches apart or 9 per square foot.

Garlic for your Salsa Garden | Grow a Good LifeGarlic:

Garlic is usually planted in the fall for larger bulbs (How to plant garlic in the fall), but it can be planted in the spring as soon as the ground can be worked. The spring grown bulbs will be smaller, but will taste the same. You may be able to find garlic bulbs for planting at your garden centers or order online. Space fall planted garlic 6 per square foot and spring planted garlic 9 per square foot.

Another option to add garlic flavor to your salsa is to purchase a garlic chive plant from your garden center. Chopped garlic chives will add a nice, mild garlic flavor to your salsa and will make a nice addition to your salsa garden.

Cilantro for Your Salsa Garden | Grow a Good LifeCilantro:

Cilantro adds a nice, fresh zing to salsa. Cilantro matures quickly especially in warm weather so to keep a continuous supply of cilantro available for your fresh salsa, grow a slow bolt variety, such as Cilantro Long Standing and keep seeding every 3-weeks.

Direct sow cilantro seeds in one square, 4 inches apart or 9 per square foot. Cover seeds with 1⁄2-inch of soil and keep moist. Sow another round in the next square 3-weeks later, then the next 3-weeks after that, and then the next. Keep rotating and this will maintain a steady supply of fresh cilantro growing and ready for harvest for your salsa.

Salsa Recipes

By mid-summer you will have an abundance of fresh ingredients available from the salsa garden. With all the fresh ingredients on hand, it is easy to whip up a batch of salsa. This is my simple go to recipe: Fresh Salsa.

Here is another recipe that we enjoy, Grilled Tomato Salsa. Grilling the vegetables adds a nice roasted depth to the salsa:

Grilled Tomato Salsa | Grow a Good LifeGrilled Tomato Salsa

Ingredients:

2 pounds Tomatoes
3 Anaheim Chili or Bell Peppers
1-2 Jalapeño Chili Peppers
1 medium Onion, cut in half
1 clove Garlic
1/4 cup Cilantro
1 teaspoon Lime Juice
1/8 teaspoon Salt
1/8 teaspoon Ground Cumin

Instructions:

Preheat the grill to medium-high heat. Place the tomatoes, chili peppers, and onion on the hot grate. Grill 8-10 minutes, turning the vegetables occasionally until tomato skins crack, peppers blister, and onions char. Remove vegetables from heat.

Allow the vegetables to cool until you can handle them. Wear gloves and remove seeds and membrane from the Anaheim pepper. Keep Jalapeño seeds if you want a hot salsa.
Remove the stems and peel the tomatoes.

Give vegetables a rough chop and add them to the food processor. Add the garlic, cilantro, lime juice, salt, and ground cumin to the food processor. Pulse until the salsa is at the consistency you like (I like mine smooth with no chunks).

Test seasoning with a tortilla chip and adjust as needed. Refrigerate for a least an hour to allow the flavors to blend. Serve with tortilla chips or spoon over grilled meat. Store extra in the refrigerator. Makes about 3 cups.

If you enjoy eating fresh salsa in the summer, growing a salsa garden will provide you with the fresh ingredients you need to whip up salsa at a moments notice.

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21 thoughts on “Grow a Salsa Garden Plus a Grilled Tomato Salsa Recipe

  1. Margaret

    I canned salsa for the first time last year (with all homegrown ingredients) & there is just no comparison to the store bought stuff, that’s for sure!

    Reply
    1. ~Rachel Arsenault Post author

      Margaret, I agree completely. Because of our tomato shortage last year, I am already out of home canned salsa. I tried a store bought jar and can’t finish it. It just doesn’t taste the same.

      Reply
  2. Matt

    Grilled vegetables! This recipe is up my alley, It sounds amaizing , Ill have to try it this year. Thanks… Have you ever canned it?

    Reply
  3. Linda@MixedKreations

    I love salsa! I usually do make my own because homemade is so much better. We moved last May and I still don’t have my area tilled up because we been busy remodeling. But I did get a small raised bed up for my onions and garlic. There’s still a little move left to maybe plant a couple pepper plants (like my salsa hot). I’m thinking that I may just make another raised bed for the tomatoes. I would love to learn how to can my own salsa. That’s for sharing your nice post and recipe, I’ve never tried grilling my tomatoes and pepper before making the salsa. Will have to give that a try. Thanks!

    Reply
    1. ~Rachel Arsenault Post author

      Linda, One of the benefits of a square foot garden is that you build it on top of the ground. No tilling needed. Another suggestion is to make a few self watering containers (http://growagoodlife.com/constructing-18-gal-self-watering-containers-swc/) for growing tomatoes. One 18-gallon tote can grow two Roma tomatoes.

      If you are interested in canning your salsa, you will need to use a recipe that can be canned safely. I use the Zesty Salsa recipe from Ball for canning (http://www.freshpreserving.com/recipes/zesty-salsa).

      Reply
  4. daisy

    What a fabulous way to grow a garden! I love how organized it is. Thanks for sharing this wonderful post on The Maple Hill Hop! Enjoy your salsa!

    Reply
  5. Brianne

    I love the idea of a salsa garden… And of GRILLED veg in my salsa. What a great idea! I’m pinning this one. Hello from Urban Naturale’s blog hop!

    Reply
  6. JES the Pilgrim

    There is nothing like fresh salsa! We grow those ingredients but I like how you called it a salsa garden 🙂 Very clever! Thank you for sharing with us on the Art of Home-Making Mondays!

    Reply
  7. Valerie

    Rachel ….this looks so good and is making me soooooo hungry now. I have to go to my first Spring party of the season today and if the grill was hooked up I so would be making this today.

    Hugs from Oklahoma,

    Valerie

    Reply
  8. Marla

    Hi Rachel,
    Just a note to let you know that I have chosen your post as one of my features for this weeks Real Food Fridays blog hop that goes live on Thursday @ 7pm EST. Thank you for being part of Real Food Friday and sharing your wonderful post.

    Reply
  9. Raia Torn

    My family is full of salsa fiends, but I’ve actually never tried making my own! Your recipe sounds delicious and I might have to give it a try. Hopefully my tomato plants will actually grow this year!

    Thanks so much for sharing this at Savoring Saturdays – I’m going to feature it at this weekend’s party – I hope you’ll come back and share with us again!

    Reply
  10. Jan

    I have trouble with onions here in Virginia! I keep trying though, but can’t figure it out! Thanks for sharing all this over at Country Fair Blog Party! Please come back in May and keep us posted on what you are up to!

    Reply

Thank you so much for your comments. I love hearing from you!