Fill Your Pantry with Home Canned Carrots

Take advantage of the summer and fall harvests to stock your pantry shelves with home canned carrots and build your home food storage.
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This was my best year growing carrots…Ever.

I have struggled with growing spring carrots ever since I began gardening. There has never been enough harvest for home canned carrots. This year I vowed to conquer my spring carrot growing issues that have plagued me in the past. (See: Hope for Carrots)

It Worked!

We enjoyed fresh carrots all summer and the bulk of the spring-sown carrots were harvested in September here and here. I weighed these harvests and ended up with 25 pounds of carrots. This tally does not include the carrots harvested as needed for fresh eating over the summer.

Take advantage of the summer and fall harvests to stock your pantry shelves with home canned carrots and build your home food storage.

The fall-sown carrots are also doing well and have the potential of adding another 20+ pounds to my yearly tally. I have never grown so many carrots before! The fall carrots will be maturing soon, so the majority of the summer harvest was canned and added to storage. It was nice to fill the pantry with fresh home canned carrots.

How to Pressure Can Carrots

Carrots and other low acid foods are preserved by using a Pressure Canner, which heats the contents to 240˚F eliminating the risk of food borne bacteria. One of the first purchases I made when I began gardening was a Presto 16-Quart Aluminum Pressure Canner. It also doubles as a Water Bath Canner with the lid unlocked. It holds 9 pint sized jars.

Other helpful canning accessories often come as a kit like this one: Home Canning Utensil Kit. It includes magnetic lid lifter, coated tongs, coated jar wrench, bubble popper, canning funnel, and jar lifter.

Take advantage of the summer and fall harvests to stock your pantry shelves with home canned carrots and build your home food storage.

Home Canned Carrots

Take advantage of the summer and fall harvests to stock your pantry shelves with home canned carrots and build your home food storage.Ingredients:
12 pounds of carrots
Canning salt (optional)

Equipment:
Pressure Canner
Large Pot of Boiling Water
Small Pot of Water Over Low Heat
9 Pint Jars
Lids and Bands
Magnetic Lid Lifter
Jar Lifter
Canning Funnel
Bubble Popper
Kitchen Towels

Procedure:
1. Prepare your jars and lids by washing in warm, soapy water and rinsing thoroughly. Place jar rack into pressure canner, set jars in the canner, add water, and boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize. Warm lids in a small pot over low heat. Keep jars and lids warm until ready to use. (*)

2. Prepare your carrots by scrubbing, peeling, and washing again. Cut into slices, chunks, or large jar sized pieces.

3. Spread kitchen towel on the counter. Using your jar lifter, remove warm jars from canner, drain, and line up on the towel. Using your canning funnel, raw pack carrots into jars leaving 1-inch head space. If using canning salt, add 1/2 tsp per pint jar.

4. Ladle boiling water over carrots maintaining 1-inch head space. Remove air bubbles with the bubble popper and wipe the rims. Use your magnetic lid lifter to lift lids out of the warm water, center lid on the jar, and screw on band until it is fingertip tight.

5. Using jar lifter, place jars carefully into pressure canner leaving space in between them. Once jars are all in canner, adjust the water level per your pressure canner’s instructions. If adding water, use the hot water from your large pot.

6. Process pint jars of carrots at 10 pounds of pressure for 25 minutes at altitudes of less than 1,000 ft. Follow the directions for your pressure canner and adjust processing time for your altitude if necessary.

7. When processing time is complete, turn off heat and allow pressure canner to cool down on its own (approximately 1 hour).

8. When pressure canner is cooled down, spread a kitchen towel on the counter, unlock cover and remove by tilting lid away from you so that steam does not burn your face. Use a jar lifter to lift jars carefully from canner and place on the towel. Allow the jars to cool for 12 to 24-hours. You should hear the satisfactory “ping” of the jar lids sealing.

9. After 12 to 24-hours, check to be sure jar lids have sealed by pushing on the center of the lid. The lid should not pop up. If the lid flexes up and down, it did not seal. Refrigerate jar and use up within a few days.

10. Remove the screw on bands and wash the jars. Label and date the jars.

All times are at altitudes of less than 1,000 ft. Adjustments must be made for altitudes greater than 1,000 ft. Store your jars in a cool, dark place and use within 12 months. Yields 9 Pint Jars.

Fill Your Pantry with Home Canned Carrots
 
Author:
Recipe type: Canning
Serves: 9 pints
Ingredients
  • 12 pounds of carrots
  • Canning salt (optional)
Equipment:
  • Pressure Canner
  • Large Pot of Boiling Water
  • Small Pot of Water Over Low Heat
  • 9 Pint Jars
  • Lids and Bands
  • Magnetic Lid Lifter
  • Jar Lifter
  • Canning Funnel
  • Bubble Popper
  • Kitchen Towels
Instructions
  1. Prepare your jars and lids by washing in warm, soapy water and rinsing thoroughly. Place jar rack into pressure canner, set jars in the canner, add water, and boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize. Warm lids in a small pot over low heat. Keep jars and lids warm until ready to use. (*)
  2. Prepare your carrots by scrubbing, peeling, and washing again. Cut into slices, chunks, or large jar sized pieces.
  3. Spread kitchen towel on the counter. Using your jar lifter, remove warm jars from canner, drain, and line up on the towel. Using your canning funnel, raw pack carrots into jars leaving 1-inch head space. If using canning salt, add 1/2 tsp per pint jar.
  4. Ladle boiling water over carrots maintaining 1-inch head space. Remove air bubbles with the bubble popper and wipe the rims. Use your magnetic lid lifter to lift lids out of the warm water, center lid on the jar, and screw on band until it is fingertip tight.
  5. Using jar lifter, place jars carefully into pressure canner leaving space in between them. Once jars are all in canner, adjust the water level per your pressure canner’s instructions. If adding water, use the hot water from your large pot.
  6. Process pint jars of carrots at 10 pounds of pressure for 25 minutes at altitudes of less than 1,000 ft. Follow the directions for your pressure canner and adjust processing time for your altitude if necessary.
  7. When processing time is complete, turn off heat and allow pressure canner to cool down on its own (approximately 1 hour).
  8. When pressure canner is cooled down, spread a kitchen towel on the counter, unlock cover and remove by tilting lid away from you so that steam does not burn your face. Use a jar lifter to lift jars carefully from canner and place on the towel. Allow the jars to cool for 12 to 24-hours. You should hear the satisfactory “ping” of the jar lids sealing.
  9. After 12 to 24-hours, check to be sure jar lids have sealed by pushing on the center of the lid. The lid should not pop up. If the lid flexes up and down, it did not seal. Refrigerate jar and use up within a few days.
  10. Remove the screw on bands and wash the jars. Label and date the jars.
  11. All times are at altitudes of less than 1,000 ft. Adjustments must be made for altitudes greater than 1,000 ft. Store your jars in a cool, dark place and use within 12 months. Yields 9 Pint Jars.

 

*Note: Recently, Jarden Home Brands, the company that produces Ball and Kerr canning jars and lids announced that pre-sterilizing jars and heating lids is no longer necessary when using their brand if you are processing jars in your canner for 10 minutes or more. It doesn’t hurt, so I choose to continue doing so.

Take advantage of the summer and fall harvests to stock your pantry shelves with home canned carrots and build your home food storage.Additional Tips:

  • I use a permanent marker to write the contents and date on the jar lid. This works for my storage pantry but doesn’t look very pretty when giving away jars as gifts. Here is a way to Remove Ink from Jar Lids.
  • Many are turned off by the idea of canned carrots, but home canned carrots are not like the mushy and metallic tasting commercially canned carrots you find in your grocery store. Just keep in mind, smaller pieces will be softer when canned.
  • USDA Complete Guide to Home Canning
  • How to Can: Getting Started at the Ball Website

 

If you don’t grow your own carrots, consider purchasing in bulk at a local farmer’s market when in season and preserve to enjoy all year. Canned carrots can be prepared quickly for meals. Since pressure canning cooks them, they only need 10 minutes on the stove to heat up. They are also easy to add to add to soups. Add the whole jar at the end of the cooking time and boil for at least 10 minutes.

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27 thoughts on “Fill Your Pantry with Home Canned Carrots

  1. daphnegould

    It is my bast carrot year ever too. I haven’t harvested any of my fall storage carrots yet. I’m not going to can them though. I’ll probably freeze some and just store some in the fridge. I might even have enough to try to store some in the basement. We will see in November probably.

    Reply
    1. Rachel Post author

      Daphne, I haven’t harvested any of the fall carrots yet either. I still have some in the refrigerator from the earlier harvests. I will probably can the fall carrot too because our freezer is full right now.

      Reply
  2. Terri Presser

    We didn’t have a great season where we live (In Australia) for our carrots but my husband swapped some home made cheddar cheese for a huge bag of carrots. This was great. I canned them they way you did and then I grated some as well. After I had finished and started using them I wished that I had grated more because they are great in soups and cakes and quiches. I’m looking forward to hopefully growing our own this season and canning like you did. Thank you for sharing this post. Blessings. Terri

    Reply
  3. Margaret

    We usually eat a lot of our carrots raw, so it never occurred to me to can them (not that I could right now as I don’t have a pressure canner – yet!). But your idea for using them in soups and stews is great! Once I get that canner and have a good haul of carrots, I will definitely consider doing this.

    Reply
    1. Rachel Post author

      Margaret, I prefer fresh carrots and still have a lot in the refrigerator that we are eating up. The spring carrot bed provided over 25-pounds and the fall carrots will be ready soon. That left plenty of carrots to preserve for storage.

      Reply
  4. Coni

    I just can not grow Carrots in the spring so this year when I planted my greens i planted 3 packs of carrot seeds I have about 20 carrots. Please tell me how to grow carrots! I did find a 10 pound bag of carrots and I canned them.

    Reply
  5. Marla

    I had never tried to can carrots but sure does sound like a great idea. You have provided a lot of great information here. Thanks for sharing on Real Food Fridays. Twitted & pinned!

    Reply
  6. Kathi

    LOVED the tip about erasing marker from the jar lids! My carrot crop didn’t happen this year, but I bought carrots and canned them. You’re right, they’re not mushy at all, and are so handy to add to soups and stews – which is how I usually serve them.

    Reply
  7. dvelten

    Gee, I would like to have 50 pounds of beautiful carrots like that. Only 2 seeds out of 9 square feet planted to carrots germinated. Since I wanted some to dehydrate for my soup mix, I tried the local farm stand. They had none for sale since his entire field of carrots failed to germinate,so I don’t feel so bad for me (but awful for him).

    Reply
  8. Dave @ OurHappyAcres

    So far it has been a good year for carrots here too. I am hoping the fall crop does well too. I usually store as many as I can in the frig, and freeze any extras. Canning sounds like a great way to handle a lot of carrots, and especially for those with larger families.

    Reply
    1. Rachel Post author

      Dave, I still have a few pounds in the refrigerator from the September harvest to carry us through until the fall carrots are ready. I prefer fresh, but canned carrots are very handy when you need to prepare a side dish in a hurry.

      Reply
  9. WolfSong

    Canned carrots is a favorite around here. Carrots in general is a favorite! Between my daughter and 4 horses, we can’t grow enough carrots.
    Last year I grew white, orange, purple and red carrots. Made for some beautifully colored jars. 🙂

    Reply
  10. Deborah Smikle-Davis

    Carrots are so sweet and delicious. They are a real favorite of mine! How delicious these canned carrots look! You’ll be set for winter! Thank you so much for sharing carrot canning tips with us at the Healthy, Happy, Green and Natural Party Blog Hop. I appreciate it!

    Reply
  11. JES

    Beautiful carrots! We have been eating ours faster than we can grow them… Although we have also been juicing some. I definitely want to give canning carrots a try, thanks for the inspiration! Please join us again on the Art of Home-Making Mondays! Great blog!! 🙂

    Reply
  12. JES the Pilgrim

    Hello there! Beautiful carrots! We have been eating ours faster than we can grow them… Although we have also been juicing some. I definitely want to give canning carrots a try, thanks for the inspiration! Please join us again on the Art of Home-Making Mondays! Great blog!! 🙂

    Reply
  13. Par

    I canned about 10-12 pounds of organic carrots using this method. They came out way too soft, over cooked. What do think caused this? This was such a disappointment. Thanks.

    Reply
    1. ©Rachel Arsenault Post author

      Par, I am sorry you were disappointed with your carrots. Yes, the carrots will be soft because the process of pressure canning cooks them. Another way of preserving carrots is to blanch and freeze: http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/freeze/carrot.html. This gives a slightly firmer texture. As far as your canned carrots, if they are too soft for you try using them for carrot soup: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchens/carrot-soup-recipe.html

      Reply

Thank you so much for your comments. I love hearing from you!