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Marinated Roasted Red Peppers Canning Recipe
Prep Time
30 mins
Cook Time
20 mins
Total Time
50 mins
 
This marinated roasted red peppers canning recipe is made with sweet red peppers, roasted and preserved in a flavorful red wine vinegar olive oil marinade.
Course: Pantry
Cuisine: American
Keyword: marinated roasted red peppers
Servings: 64 servings
Calories: 33 kcal
Author: Grow a Good Life
Ingredients
Instructions
Prepare the canning equipment:
  1. Wash the canning jars and lids in warm, soapy water and rinse well.
  2. Place the jar rack into the water bath canner, set the clean jars in the canner, add water, and boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize.
  3. Warm your lids in a small pot over low heat. Keep jars and lids warm until they are ready to use.
Prepare your peppers:
  1. Rinse peppers well under clean, running water. Cut each pepper in half, and remove the stems, seeds, and ribs.
  2. Blister the skins of your peppers by grilling or broiling until the skins crack and separate from the flesh.
  3. Remove the peppers from the heat and place in a covered glass bowl to steam.
  4. Once the peppers are cool enough to handle, remove the skins, and tear or cut into pieces or strips.
Make the marinating brine:
  1. Heat about 1 tablespoon of the olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the onions and garlic and sauté briefly until fragrant, about 2 minutes.
  2. Add the remaining olive oil, vinegar, lemon juice, dried oregano, and sugar if using. Bring to a boil, and then reduce the heat to low. Keep warm until you are ready to use.
Can the peppers:
  1. Spread a kitchen towel on the counter. Use your jar lifter to remove the warm jars from the canner, drain, and line up on a kitchen towel.
  2. Divide the peeled roasted peppers evenly into the jars.
  3. Give the marinating brine a good stir to be sure the oil is evenly distributed. Use your canning funnel and ladle to fill the jars about halfway with the brine.
  4. Run your bubble popper through the jars to mix the peppers with the brine.
  5. Top off each jar with the remaining brine leaving a 1/2-inch headspace. Run the bubble popper through the jars again to remove air bubbles.
  6. Clean the rims of the jars, use your magnetic lid lifter to lift lids out of the warm water, center lid on the jar, and screw on band until it is fingertip tight.
  7. Using the jar lifter, place the jars in the water bath canner on the jar rack and leave space in between them. Once jars are all in canner, adjust the water level so it is 2-inches over the tops of the jars. If adding water, use the hot water from your small pot and pour around the jars, rather than on them.
  8. Cover the canner and bring the water to a rolling boil over medium-high heat. Once the water is boiling, process both half-pints and pints for 15 minutes at altitudes of less than 1,000 ft. (adjust processing time for your altitude if necessary).
  9. When processing time is complete, turn off heat and allow the canner to cool down for 5-minutes.
  10. Spread a kitchen towel on the counter. Use a jar lifter to lift jars carefully from canner and place on the towel. You should hear the satisfactory "ping" of the jar lids sealing as they cool. Allow the jars to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24-hours.
  11. After 12 to 24-hours, check to be sure jar lids have sealed by pushing on the center of the lid. The lid should not pop up. If the lid flexes up and down, it did not seal. Refrigerate jar and use up within 2 weeks.
  12. Remove the screw on bands and wash the jars. Label, date, and store the jars of marinated red bell peppers in a cool, dark location for up to a year.
  13. For best flavor, let the jars sit for at least 4 weeks before opening to allow the flavors to develop. Refrigerate after opening and use up within 2 weeks.
  14. Yields about 8 half-pint or 4 pints.
Recipe Notes
  • This recipe is adapted from the "Marinated Peppers" in the USDA Complete Guide to Home Canning. Changing the recipe can make the product unsafe. Improper procedures when canning in oil can result in risk of botulism.
  • All times are at altitudes of less than 1,000 ft. Adjustments must be made for altitudes greater than 1,000 ft.